The Arrow Collar Man

One of the best-known men’s shirt brands is Arrow, which is part of Cluett, Peabody & Co. Arrow started with Hannah Lord Montague, who invented a detachable collar for a man’s shirt in 1885. The innovation allowed a man to have a crisp collar without having to wash his shirt daily. Illustrator J.C. Leyendecker popularized the brand by creating the Arrow Collar Man. This fashion icon essentially became the male counterpart to the Gibson Girl. In the 1920s, shirts became more casual and started to deviate from the detachable collar, favoring a collar that was connected to the shirt. Read more

Going Digital

We’ve been working hard to make more of the History Center’s collection available online. What are some recent additions to our collection database? Read the post to see some examples. Read more

Richmond History Tours 2012 Season Kicks Off April 1


RICHMOND – March 5, 2012 –
The Valentine Richmond History Center is pleased to announce the 2012 Richmond History Tours season formerly referred to as Historic Richmond Tours.  The name was changed this year to align the program with the History Center’s name.  The History Center offers more than 370 opportunities to explore Richmond history on foot or by bus. Tour topics vary and include the neighborhoods, architecture, churches, movie theaters, retail districts, monuments, cemeteries, waterways and people that make the city unique. All guides are trained and certified by the History Center. Read more

The Wickham House at 200 years – The 1812 Tour

With the arrival of the 200th anniversary of the Wickham House, came the opportunity to highlight the historic house, its original family and the social, religious, cultural, economic, and political atmosphere and events of Richmond in 1812. It is our hope that the combination of these varying spheres into one cohesive tour will engage both volunteers and visitors alike and help us to see and understand the Wickham House in new ways as the tour is presented throughout 2012. Read more

Commemorating the History of African Americans in Central Virginia

As a staff member at the Valentine Richmond History Center, I have heard stories of how this institution has uniquely offered a place where local African American children could explore the 400-year history of Richmond.  In its 114 years of operation, the History Center has consistently included African American themes in its educational programs.  An integral part of the organization’s mission is to chronicle the contributions of African Americans to the ongoing growth and success of the Richmond region. Read more

A Word From Your Friendly Neighborhood Archivist

The Valentine Richmond History Center Collection

Did you know that Richmond has an amazing art heritage?  Some of the best American artists have called the River City home.  Among them are father and son photography team George and Huestis Cook, makers of some of the most iconic photographic images of Virginia.  Other artists represented in our manuscript collections include important painters such as William James Hubard (1807-1862), Conrad Wise Chapman (1843–1910) and his father John Gadsby Chapman (1808–1889).  The History Center also has the records of the Craig House Art Center, an important organization for African-American art in the 1930’s. Read more

Henrico County through the Eyes of an Intern

There is something quite magical about black and white photographs. The History Center’s new exhibit Into Focus: Henrico County Through the Camera celebrates Henrico County’s 400th anniversary with a really fantastic set of images belonging to both the museum and the county. Read more

History Center Announces 2011 History Makers Honorees

RICHMOND-The 7th Annual Richmond History Makers Program pays tribute to everyday citizens and outstanding organizations that make significant contributions to the greater Richmond region. The History Center and its partners celebrate their success at a gala reception and award ceremony on October 18th. Read more

Why It’s Okay that October is Crazy

A lot of things happen in October. Baseball playoffs. Halloween. The birthday of almost everyone I know. But for me, above all else, October means the Richmond History Makers program here at the History Center. Richmond has many worthy awards programs, but History Makers is the only one that recognizes such a diverse group of people, in a parking lot, on a Tuesday night in October. Bear with me. Read more

Remembering the Civil War Centennial in Richmond…

 

…Even Though We’d Like to Forget.

by Bill Martin, Director, Valentine Richmond History Center

As we begin our commemoration of the Civil War and Emancipation, it is helpful to reflect on the changes and similarities between our plans for next four years to the Civil War Centennial events in the 1960’s.  In a series of articles over next 4 years, I will be looking into the 1.6 million objects in the collections of the Valentine Richmond History Center to explore the common elements shared by both the Civil War and Emancipation 150 Committee and the Richmond Civil War Centennial Committee and the significant changes that have occurred in the ways we approach the Civil War and its impact today. Read more